61094 Geobotanical Characterization of a River Beach for Forensic Purposes.

Poster Number 1

See more from this Division: Third International Soil Forensics Conference
See more from this Session: Soil Forensic Poster Presentations
Tuesday, November 2, 2010
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency DEF Foyer, Third Floor
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Ńurea Carvalho1, Helena Ribeiro1, Alexandra Guedes2, Ilda Abreu3 and Fernando Noronha1, (1)DGAOT da Faculdade de CiÍncias da Universidade do Porto, Centro de Geologia da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal
(2)DGAOT da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Centro de Geologia da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal
(3)Departamento de Biologia da Faculdade de CiÍncias da Universidade do Porto, Centro de Geologia da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal
The combination of geology and botany in forensic research has increased in recent years and their use is of particular importance in the association of a victim and/or a suspect to a crime scene.

The Areínho beach, in Vila Nova de Gaia town (North of Portugal), is a beach in Douro River, the second more important river in Portugal, which although isolated is a very busy area due to the bathing season in the summer and to water sports during the other seasons. Moreover this is a complex area with different lithologies, considerable vegetation and also the transport of sediments along the course of the Douro River.

Aiming to characterize this beach, soil samples have been collected and analyzed by a combination of geoforensic techniques, namely color, particle size distribution, low-field magnetic susceptibility, mineralogy (optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy) and pollen content. The surrounding vegetation has also been characterized and seasonal studies carried out. This research will be used in providing criminal intelligence for forensic investigations.

See more from this Division: Third International Soil Forensics Conference
See more from this Session: Soil Forensic Poster Presentations
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