253-6 Field Survey of Spring Canola Production Practices in ND and MN.

See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Crop Production: Spring
Wednesday, November 3, 2010: 9:00 AM
Long Beach Convention Center, Room 201A, Second Floor
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Brian Jenks, North Central Research Extension Center, North Dakota State University, Minot, ND
Canola fields were monitored across ND and MN in 2008 and 2009 to assess the impact of different management practices and environmental conditions on canola production.  A total of 46 fields in 11 counties representing the major canola growing regions of ND and MN were monitored from emergence to harvest.  For each field monitored, we obtained a five-year crop rotation and chemical history, seeding information, fertilizer timing and rates, variety, soil test results, and yield data.  Each field was visited at least seven times during the growing season.  Data was collected on planting date, stand establishment, crop stage, plant vigor/health, soil moisture, fertility, insect damage, disease incidence and severity, weed control, harvest method, yield, seed quality, etc.  Weather conditions for each field during the growing season were obtained from the closest weather station.  We observed that most pests were generally held in check and did not highly impact yield.  Fertility was generally not a problem.  Stands were generally good, with some variability in 2008 due to cool, dry conditions early in the growing season.  Wind-blown swaths were not an issue in either year.  Two farmers straight-cut their canola (no swath) with excellent results.  After reviewing weather data and comparing yields across the state, it appears that cold and very wet conditions early in the growing season followed by hot, dry conditions later in the growing season may have had the greatest detrimental impact on yields.  Planting very early, especially in cold no-till soils may lead to slower emergence and more potential damage from frost, wind, flea beetles, etc.  Canola may have higher yield potential when it emerges quickly in warmer soils and is better able to withstand damage from frost and insects.  While this survey showed that many growers have successfully grown canola in tight rotations, this practice is extremely reliant on canola varieties with high disease resistance. 
See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Crop Production: Spring