256-3 Value Added Nutritional Components of Canola for Improved Quality of Health.

See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Breeding / Conventional / Spring & Winter
Wednesday, November 3, 2010: 3:35 PM
Long Beach Convention Center, Room 201A, Second Floor
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Ernst Cebert, Martha Verghese, Nahid Sistani, Rhona Miller-Cebert and Aretha Clisby, Alabama A&M University, Normal, AL
Many studies have reported strong link between cancer and diet, whereby some cancer deaths can be reduced by consumption of a healthy well- balanced diet. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of canola (Brassica napus L.) as a new crop to increase the variety of nutritious vegetables available to consumers, with evidence to support reduction of risk factors for some diseases including cancer. Canola cultivars were analyzed to determine mineral, protein and folate composition of raw canola leafy greens for comparison to those of collard-greens, kale (Brassica oleraceae L. Acephala) and cabbage. Results showed that canola was significantly higher in potassium (K) content than cabbage and kale, but lower than that found in collard.  The essential micronutrient iron (Fe), (24.77 mg/100g dry weight) was significantly higher in canola and lowest in cabbage (7.65 mg/100g dry weight), while zinc (Zn) and manganese (Mn) contents of canola (3.00 and 16.40 g/100g dry weight, respectively) were greater than that found in cabbage and collard. No significant difference was found in the mean protein content of kale (24.85%) and the canola cultivar, Kronos (22.70%). Although not statistically significant, the trend from highest to lowest folate content among the Brassica species in this study was: Kale>Canola>Cabbage>Collard. Folate distribution ranged from 0.02 mg/100g in collard greens to 0.148 mg/100g and 0.149 mg/100g in canola (cultivar Jetton) and kale, respectively. In a separate study, the feeding of canola/mustard was used to determine efficacy of canola seeds (S), sprouts (SP), and canola oil (CO) on Azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and tumors in Fisher 344 male rats. Results indicated ACF reductions in the treatment groups (7% CO and 14% CO) compared to the controls (7% SBO, 14% SBO) were 60 and 46% respectively, while enzyme activity was higher in rats fed treatment diets compared to the control diet. Tumors in rats fed Canola and mustard (7% and 14%) ranged from 6 – 25, significantly lower than the number of tumors in control groups. This study showed that canola greens could be a nutritionally acceptable substitute for traditional leafy green vegetables while short term consumption reduces preneoplastic lesions in Fisher 344 male rats which are chemopreventive biomarkers. Results also showed a decrease in tumor incidence and tumor numbers in rats fed canola/mustard seed and sprout diets. Canola may therefore have significant implications in the prevention of chronic diseases such as cancer.
See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Breeding / Conventional / Spring & Winter