143-3 Canola-Based Epoxy Resins for Bio-Based Plastic Composites.

See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Symposium--Canola End Uses Biofuels/Bio-Based Products
Tuesday, November 2, 2010: 3:45 PM
Long Beach Convention Center, Room 201A, Second Floor
Share |

Judith D. Espinoza-Perez, Dennis Wiesenborn, Chad A. Ulven and Cole R. Gustafson, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND
Due to the world’s current high dependence on petroleum-based products and their negative environmental impact, alternative and economically competitive products from renewable sources are desirable. Vegetable oils are a renewable source for the production of oleochemicals. Currently, canola-oil based resins are not commercially available. This research group has established a lab-scale process to produce canola resins. A canola oil-based epoxy resin was produced and characterized, and proposed as an alternative to soybean oil-based epoxy resin. Canola oil was epoxidized in a solvent-free process, with peracetic acid and a heterogeneous catalyst. The catalyst is readily recovered and reused, unlike the liquid acid catalysts traditionally used. Processing conditions achieved a 98.5% conversion. The produced resin was applied in the preparation of fiber-reinforced composites. These composites can be used to create strong, light-weight exterior shields for machinery. High contents (30, 35, and 40%) of the produced canola resin were applied as part of the matrix in the fabrication of E-glass fiber reinforced composites. More flexible but less strong composites were obtained as the initial content of canola oil-based epoxy resin increased. Our current research is focused in the enhancement of the  flexure strength and fiber-matrix adhesion of the composites testing different curing agents. The raw material cost of the canola resin was estimated and compared with a soybean resin. The raw material cost simulation showed that canola resin may actually cost less than soybean resin. The model identified which materials contributed the most to the resin cost, therefore helping to prioritize future research aimed at reducing resin cost.
See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Symposium--Canola End Uses Biofuels/Bio-Based Products