253-3 Overcoming the Obstacles of Producing Winter Canola in No-till Production Systems in the Southern Great Plains.

See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Crop Production: Spring
Wednesday, November 3, 2010: 8:05 AM
Long Beach Convention Center, Room 201A, Second Floor
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Chad Godsey1, Randy Taylor1, Michael Stamm2, Kraig Roozeboom3, Victor Martin4 and Johnathon Holman5, (1)Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK
(2)Agronomy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
(3)2004 Throckmorton Plt. Sci. Ctr., Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
(4)Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
(5)Kansas State University, Garden City, KS
An increase in winter canola (Brassica napus L.) production in Oklahoma has raised some issues in no-till cropping systems. Observations of winter stand loss in no-till canola over the past several years led to a series of experiments designed to examine the influence of residue and tillage on stand establishment and winter survival. Perhaps the two biggest issues in these systems are thought to be residue and soil physical properties. The objectives were to evaluate the influence of soil physical properties on winter canola growth and determine management practices to overcome these obstacles in no-till systems. Field studies conducted from 2007-2010 in Oklahoma consisted of treatments include light disking (CT), no-till (NT), no-till with residue removed (NT-No Residue), no-till with twice as much residue (NT-2X Residue), and no-till with residue burned at planting (NT-Burn). The experiments were established on long-term no-till sites. Soil temperatures were collected at a depth of 2.5 cm. Winter stand loss, plant vigor at key points in canola plant development, and other measures of plant development were recorded. Stand establishment is easily accomplished in no-till systems but winter survival was observed to be lower in residue treatments compared with CT, NT-No Residue, and NT-Burn. Soil physical properties appear to play an important role in winter survival. Soil temperatures are cooler with NT systems compared to CT, which may delay root development.
See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Crop Production: Spring