253-5 Planting Dates and Methods for Spring Canola Establishment, Flowering and Yield in the U.S. Central High Plains.

See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Crop Production: Spring
Wednesday, November 3, 2010: 8:45 AM
Long Beach Convention Center, Room 201A, Second Floor
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Robert Aiken, Kansas State University, Colby, KS, David Baltensperger, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, James Krall, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Wyoming, Lingle, WY, Jerry Johnson, C12 Plant Science Building, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO and Alexander Pavlista, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Scottsbluff, NE
Adapted, early and short-season oilseed crops such as Brassica juncea, Brassica napus and Camelina sativa could serve as a transition crop following corn or grain sorghum and before drilling wheat in rain-fed, semi-arid, temperate cropping systems. Dry conditions can limit stand establishment; heat stress and water deficits can impair floral development, seed set and seed fill. Field studies were conducted from 2004 through 2007 at multiple locations in the U.S. central High Plains, addressing planting methods, date of planting and harvest methods. Stand establishment was favored by hoe drill but yield was favored by direct drill. Greatest emergence and yield resulted from mid-March planting date; days from emergence to 50% bloom decreased, in a linear fashion, with later emergence dates. Swathing canola three to eight days before normal combine harvest, and curing five days increased oilseed harvest by 15 – 19%.
See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Crop Production: Spring