255-6 Effects of Planting Date On Winter Canola.

See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Breeding / Biotech / Spring & Winter
Wednesday, November 3, 2010: 2:15 PM
Long Beach Convention Center, Room 201A, Second Floor
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Johnathon Holman1, Michael Stamm2, Chad Godsey3, Kent Martin1 and Kraig Roozeboom2, (1)Kansas State University, Garden City, KS
(2)Agronomy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
(3)Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK
Determining the optimum planting date of canola was crucial for successful stand establishment and yield. One of the most limiting factors in Kansas canola production is identifying varieties and planting methods that result in successful stand establishment and winter survival. Once successful canola production systems are identified, it is expected that production will increase, more local grain elevators will purchase the crop, more local processing facilities will process the crop, and local feedlots will be able to use the meal (a by-product of oil crushing) as a soybean meal replacement. In 2007 tillage had no affect on canola. However, in 2008 tillage increased fall stand establishment, increased winter survival, increased spring vigor, and increased spring stand. In both years of this study, fall stand establishment was successful across planting dates except the earliest planting date in mid-August. In 2007, diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.) density and damage was greatest at the earliest planting date, and in 2008, rabbits tended to selectively feed and damage the earliest planting date the greatest. In 2007, fall stand density was greatest at the last planting date (October 15) and increased as planting date was delayed. In 2008, fall stand density was greatest at the fourth (September 29) planting date, and was lowest at the first planting date (August 22). In 2007, winter survival was greatest for the second and third planting dates (September 4 and 17), and no plants survived the last planting date (October 15). In 2008, winter survival was very poor and highest at the first planting date. No plants survived with no-till at the third planting date (September 11), or either no-till or till at the fourth (September 29) and fifth (October 20) planting dates. In 2007, spring vigor was greatest at the first three planting dates (August 16, September 4 and 17). In 2008, spring vigor was greatest with tillage at the first (August 22) and second (September 2) planting dates. In 2007, spring stand was greatest at the second, third, and fourth (September 4, 17, and 28) planting dates. In 2008, spring stand was greatest at the first (August 22) planting date and with tillage at the second (September 2) planting date. Current information suggests planting winter canola with tillage around September 1 for the best chance of winter survival and obtaining a successful spring stand.
See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Breeding / Biotech / Spring & Winter